U2 – premiere new promo video for current single ‘Every Breaking Wave’ – watch

U2 - premiere new promo video for current single 'Every Breaking Wave' - watch

From U2’s latest album Songs Of Innocence, the video for ‘Every Breaking Wave’ is directed by Belfast-born Aoife McArdle and drawn from her 13-minute short film of the same name.

Set against the social and political turmoil of early 1980s Northern Ireland where McArdle grew up, the film ‘Every Breaking Wave’ is built around themes of emotional abandon and the uncertainty of romantic relationships. The story follows two teenagers, one Catholic and the other Protestant, who fall in love amidst ongoing violence. The short film’s emotional core is centered around ‘Every Breaking Wave’ and ‘The Troubles’, two tracks drawn from U2’s most recent album Songs of Innocence

Watch ‘Every Breaking Wave’ BELOW:


U2 – Every Breaking Wave on MUZU.TV.

The film is already garnering praise and winning fans. Filmmaker Spike Jonze had not seen McArdle’s work previously but ‘was really taken’ with her film.

‘She captured that feeling and size of life of being a teenager and of first love so well. She drifts between the reality of friends and first love into fantasy so effortlessly and romantically. It’s a perfect little gem of a romance movie.’

Hotel Rwanda writer/director Terry George says McArdle has pulled off one of the most difficult tasks facing any filmmaker. ‘She has taken a Romeo and Juliet romance, set in the back streets and alleyways of Belfast, and created a universal story.
‘Aoife has captured the tragedy of our young men and women, so full of life and passion, energy and possibility, being swallowed up by the destroying rage of poverty, bigotry and repression.’

As for the band, whose song inspired the film, Edge says they find the finished film ‘extraordinary’.

‘The Aoife McArdle short film expands on the theme of Songs of innocence which was largely rooted in our experience growing up in the early eighties in Dublin.
Aoife chose west Belfast in the same period, as it was the neighbourhood that was so formative to her. We think her work is something pretty extraordinary.’

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