Album Review: Seratones – Get Gone

9/10

Album Review:  Seratones – Get Gone

It was a love of punk-rock music that brought this four-piece from Shreveport, Louisiana together a few years ago. In a city of no fixed musical genre gigging in the same circles at local barbecue joints and skater parks they somehow found each other, forged their own identity, and remained true to themselves.

The Seratones consist of A.J. Haynes (vocals), Connor Davis (guitar), Adam Davis (bass) and Jesse Gabriel (drums). They recorded their debut album Get Gone in live takes in Dial Back Sound studios in Mississippi. It certainly packs a punch and captures their spirit. Choking On Your Spit comes in high voltage like a cross between southern rock and Bow Wow Wow’s “I Want Candy”. This is raucous garage rock meets soul: punk rock making friends with gospel combining powerful vocals, great guitar riffs and drumming that makes you want to get up and dance. Following on, with a thumping drum and tambourine introduction reminiscent of Primal Scream’s “Get Your Rocks Off”, Headtrip is no pretender. It has its own style. This is a southern rock-tinged track that meets soul halfway round the block. Haynes’ vocals are effervescent and the song fizzes with energy.

Tide is as smooth as honey. Again, Haynes’ vocals are like a vibrant thread coursing through the vein of the album. On their single Chandelier her voice is at once bluesy and soulful then wholesome and warming as a toasted marshmallow. (But then she’s had a lot of practice as she started singing in her local Baptist Church at the age of six).
On Sun they get to further channel their punk-rock spirit in true X-Ray Spex style. They somehow throw in a bit of country and blues, and what a great unity of genres to shake it all up and blow the cobwebs away.

Trees is psychedelic infused and I’d be surprised if you didn’t start moving and tapping your feet to it. It’s frantic and frenetic like the aural equivalent of being taken on a rollercoaster, from A – Z and back again. Don’t Need It is another good ol’ rawk n roll track that progresses in its own way with some great catchy hooks. This has to be my favourite song on the album.

Combining their past influences and references on Get Gone, The Seratones still somehow manage to sound fresh, raw and gutsy, keeping their own sense of significance along for the journey. Long may that continue.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*